Sample 1 - State of California

Occupation Profile


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Sailors and Marine Oilers
(SOC Code : 53-5011)
in California

Stand watch to look for obstructions in path of vessel, measure water depth, turn wheel on bridge, or use emergency equipment as directed by captain, mate, or pilot. Break out, rig, overhaul, and store cargo-handling gear, stationary rigging, and running gear. Perform a variety of maintenance tasks to preserve the painted surface of the ship and to maintain line and ship equipment. Must hold government-issued certification and tankerman certification when working aboard liquid-carrying vessels. Include able seamen and ordinary seamen.

Employers usually expect an employee in this occupation to be able to do the job after Short-term on-the-job training .

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Occupational Wages[Top]
AreaYearPeriodHourly MeanHourly by Percentile
25thMedian75th
California 20131st Qtr$15.44$10.73$12.06$19.54

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Occupational Projections of Employment (also called "Outlook" or "Demand")[Top]
 AreaEstimated Year-Projected YearEmploymentEmployment ChangeAnnual Avg Openings
EstimatedProjectedNumberPercent
California 2010 - 20202,1002,50040019.0140

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Job Openings from JobCentral National Labor Exchange[Top]
 
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Within  miles of Zip Code.


Industries Employing This Occupation (click on Industry Title to View Employers List)[Top]
Industry Title
Number of Employers in State of California
Percent of Total
Employment for Occupation in State of California
Support Activities for Water Transport 34819.6%

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Data for Training Programs not available.

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About This Occupation (from O*NET - The Occupation Information Network)[Top]
Top Tasks (Specific duties and responsibilities of this job.)
Maintain government-issued certifications, as required.
Lower and man lifeboats when emergencies occur.
Stand by wheels when ships are on automatic pilot and verify accuracy of courses, using magnetic compasses.
Steer ships under the direction of commanders or navigating officers or direct helmsmen to steer, following designated courses.
Handle lines to moor vessels to wharfs, to tie up vessels to other vessels, or to rig towing lines.
Stand watch in ships` bows or bridge wings to look for obstructions in a ship`s path or to locate navigational aids, such as buoys or lighthouses.
Stand gangway watches to prevent unauthorized persons from boarding ships while in port.
Overhaul lifeboats or lifeboat gear and lower or raise lifeboats with winches or falls.
Operate, maintain, or repair ship equipment, such as winches, cranes, derricks, or weapons system.
Load or unload materials from vessels.

More Tasks for Sailors and Marine Oilers


Top Skills used in this Job
Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others` actions.
Troubleshooting - Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
Equipment Maintenance - Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
Quality Control Analysis - Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
Repairing - Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.

More Skills for Sailors and Marine Oilers


Top Abilities (Attributes of the person that influence performance in this job.)
Far Vision - The ability to see details at a distance.

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Top Work Values (Aspects of this job that create satisfaction.)
Support - Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees.
Achievement - Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment.

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Top Interests (The types of activities someone in this job would like.)
Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

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Alternate Titles
Able Seamen; Able Bodied Seamen; Bosuns; Deckhands; Mariners; Merchant Marines; Merchant Seamen; Oilers; Ordinary Seamen; Quartermasters; Tankermen; Watchmen
 
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