Home Labor Market Information Labor Force and Unemployment Rate for Cities and Census Designated Places

Labor Force and Unemployment Rate for Cities and Census Designated Places

Data for Other Areas

These data are updated monthly and are provided here for July 2014. Only not seasonally–adjusted labor force (unemployment rates) data are developed for cities and Census Designated Places (CDP). Estimates of employment by industry are not available. See the notes below about the limitations of these data.

For additional release details, please visit our 2014 Release Schedule.

Data for All County Sub-Areas

Cities and Census Designated Places by Individual County

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Alameda
Alpine (no city file)
Amador
Butte
Calaveras

Colusa
Contra Costa
Del Norte
El Dorado
Fresno

Glenn
Humboldt
Imperial
Inyo
Kern

Kings
Lake
Lassen
Los Angeles
Madera

Marin
Mariposa
Mendocino
Merced
Modoc

Mono
Monterey
Napa
Nevada
Orange

Placer
Plumas
Riverside
Sacramento
San Benito

San Bernardino
San Diego
San Francisco
San Joaquin
San Luis Obispo

San Mateo
Santa Barbara
Santa Clara
Santa Cruz
Shasta

Sierra (no city file)
Siskiyou
Solano
Sonoma
Stanislaus

Sutter
Tehama
Trinity
Tulare
Tuolumne

Ventura
Yolo
Yuba

Data Limitations

A Census Designated Place (CDP) is an unincorporated area designated by the US Census Bureau for the decennial census. The CDPs shown in these reports were designated for the 2000 census. As with the cities, no boundary or census ratio changes have been made for population expansion, annexation or incorporation. For more information, see the Census Bureau's Census 2000 Geographic Terms and Concepts.

Only not seasonally-adjusted labor force (unemployment rates) data are developed for cities and CDPs. Estimates of employment by industry are not available.

Monthly sub–county data are derived by multiplying current estimates of county–wide employment and unemployment by the respective employment and unemployment shares (percentages) in each sub–county area at the time of the 2000 Census. Sub–county labor force is then obtained by summing employment and unemployment, and the result is divided into unemployment to calculate the unemployment rate. Based on Each Area's 2000 Census Share of County Employment and Unemployment*.

This method assumes that the rates of change in employment and unemployment, since 2000, are exactly the same in each sub–county area as at the county level (i.e., that the shares are still accurate). If this assumption is not true for a specific sub–county area, then the estimates for that area may not be representative of the current economic conditions. Since this assumption is untested, caution should be employed when using these data.

About These Data

Each month the Employment Development Department, Labor Market Information Division releases unemployment rates and employment by industry data for California and substate areas. Visit the complete release schedule for exact dates.

For the state, we release two series of data:

  • Seasonally adjusted
  • Not seasonally - adjusted

The greatest detail is provided for the not seasonally-adjusted series. These are the data used to compare the California statewide data with other geographic areas in the state.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION