Sample 1 - State of California

Occupation Profile


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Airline Pilots, Copilots, and Flight Engineers
(SOC Code : 53-2011)
in California

Pilot and navigate the flight of multi-engine aircraft in regularly scheduled service for the transport of passengers and cargo. Requires Federal Air Transport rating and certification in specific aircraft type used. Include aircraft instructors with similar certification.

Employers are usually looking for candidates with a Bachelor's degree .

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Occupational Wages[Top]
AreaYearPeriodHourly MeanHourly by Percentile
25thMedian75th
California 20141st Qtr$0.00$0.00$0.00$0.00

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Occupational Projections of Employment (also called "Outlook" or "Demand")[Top]
 AreaEstimated Year-Projected YearEmploymentEmployment ChangeAnnual Avg Openings
EstimatedProjectedNumberPercent
California 2010 - 20206,8007,0002002.9280

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Job Openings from JobCentral National Labor Exchange[Top]
 
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Within  miles of Zip Code.


Industries Employing This Occupation (click on Industry Title to View Employers List)[Top]
Industry Title
Number of Employers in State of California
Percent of Total
Employment for Occupation in State of California
Scheduled Air Transportation 53792.8%

About Staffing Patterns
 

Training Programs (click on title for more information)[Top]
Program Title
Airline/Commercial/Professional Pilot and Flight Crew
Flight Instructor

About Training & Apprenticeships
 

About This Occupation (from O*NET - The Occupation Information Network)[Top]
Top Tasks (Specific duties and responsibilities of this job.)
Work as part of a flight team with other crew members, especially during takeoffs and landings.
Use instrumentation to guide flights when visibility is poor.
Start engines, operate controls, and pilot airplanes to transport passengers, mail, or freight, adhering to flight plans, regulations, and procedures.
Contact control towers for takeoff clearances, arrival instructions, and other information, using radio equipment.
Monitor gauges, warning devices, and control panels to verify aircraft performance and to regulate engine speed.
Respond to and report in-flight emergencies and malfunctions.
Steer aircraft along planned routes, using autopilot and flight management computers.
Check passenger and cargo distributions and fuel amounts to ensure that weight and balance specifications are met.
Monitor engine operation, fuel consumption, and functioning of aircraft systems during flights.
Inspect aircraft for defects and malfunctions, according to pre-flight checklists.

More Tasks for Airline Pilots, Copilots, and Flight Engineers


Top Skills used in this Job
Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.

More Skills for Airline Pilots, Copilots, and Flight Engineers


Top Abilities (Attributes of the person that influence performance in this job.)
Control Precision - The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.
Response Orientation - The ability to choose quickly between two or more movements in response to two or more different signals (lights, sounds, pictures). It includes the speed with which the correct response is started with the hand, foot, or other body part.
Problem Sensitivity - The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
Spatial Orientation - The ability to know your location in relation to the environment or to know where other objects are in relation to you.
Rate Control - The ability to time your movements or the movement of a piece of equipment in anticipation of changes in the speed and/or direction of a moving object or scene.
Reaction Time - The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears.
Near Vision - The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
Far Vision - The ability to see details at a distance.
Depth Perception - The ability to judge which of several objects is closer or farther away from you, or to judge the distance between you and an object.
Written Comprehension - The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.

More Abilities for Airline Pilots, Copilots, and Flight Engineers


Top Work Values (Aspects of this job that create satisfaction.)
Support - Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees.
Independence - Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions.

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Top Interests (The types of activities someone in this job would like.)
Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

More Interests for Airline Pilots, Copilots, and Flight Engineers

 
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